NEWMEDIA | The Reefs of Belize – Fulldome & VR Short
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The Reefs of Belize – Fulldome & VR Short

24 Apr 2017, Posted by Camilo Anna in Art
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In January 2016, Allan Adams and Keith Ellenbogen took a group of MIT students scuba diving in Belize as part of a college course on underwater conservation photography. Coral reefs worldwide are deteriorating due to changes in our climate and so it’s important to document both the beauty of our oceans and what’s happening to them. Capturing this moment in time is important for future generations to learn from, be immersed in, and be inspired from.

Keith Ellenbogen is an acclaimed underwater photographer and videographer who focuses on environmental conservation. Ellenbogen documents marine life to showcase its beauty and to elicit an emotional connection to the underwater world. He aims to inspire social change and action toward protecting the marine environment.

Over the past few years, Ellenbogen has collaborated with MIT theoretical physicist Allan Adams who is focuses on the intersection of art, science, and cutting-edge technology. During his residency, they worked with Edgerton Center Associate Director Jim Bales to explore new high-speed photography and other underwater imaging techniques. They also developed an ‘Underwater Conservation Photography’ course taught at MIT and challenged students to push technical and aesthetic boundaries in the pursuit of compelling images of marine conservation.

Behind the Scenes

Allan and Keith approached the Museum of Science’s planetarium team because of its expertise in 360° video. It was a perfect meeting of minds and collaboration started immediately to fully test the equipment and plan for the dive. 360° video is very challenging to begin with and it’s even more difficult underwater, so I’ve documented some of the important things we learned.

From the very beginning we were aiming to use the immersive scuba footage for a live lecture in the planetarium. It was only after throwing this event that we realized other planetariums and the VR community might be interested. We should note that this was our first underwater project and we have learned a ton along the way. So some of the shots are a little shaky, lighting isn’t ideal, footage contrasty, and no underwater audio was recorded. Shooting underwater is difficult and you simply cannot improvise with shot techniques in the same way as a 360° shoot on land. But that’s hindsight and so we decided to share the best shots edited into a short film, even if it doesn’t reach the high bar we’ve set for ourselves. Because what’s the use of it keeping it private? We are proud of this project and hope it can inspire others to remember the hidden beauty of the ocean.

360Abyss-RigBut you might be wondering, how do you capture underwater 360° video? It’s possible through the use of 6 GoPro cameras and the specially designed 360Rize 360Abyss scuba rig. Since it’s going underwater, it needs to be watertight and also use domes for the camera porthole due to water refraction.

Prior to the expedition, we needed to test the 360° camera rig underwater and preferably not just in an old bucket. Luckily Keith is good friends with the New England Aquarium and so our first tests were within the Giant Ocean Tank, a gigantic cylindrical aquarium in the center of the aquarium. We were instantly excited about the results. During this time students were practicing shooting still photography within an olympic-size pool.

There are so many worrying factors when pairing scuba diving with photography. You need to keep track of oxygen levels, focus and expose your camera, be careful of sea life, keep the group together, track the boat, and the list goes on. So being prepared mentally, physically, and technically is important.

See the original article here.